Using Approach Notes To Improve Your Bass Lines

2017-11-01T13:25:51+00:00 June 19th, 2015|3 Comments

This lesson I cover diatonic and chromatic approach notes. These are a great way of getting started on building your own bass lines because you don’t have to get too caught up in all the arpeggios and scales.

3 Comments

  1. Anthony May June 19, 2015 at 9:07 pm - Reply

    I continue to love your “Don’t Panic!” approach. I haven’t been playing very long (2.5 years) and I learn something from every lesson, whether I know the topic or not.

  2. Harrison Picot June 23, 2015 at 1:45 am - Reply

    Really great lesson for some (like me) who want to practice playing along with recordings, but hesitates when trying to spell a chord ( most scores are not limited to C, F, and G.)

    This a great way to use the chord symbols to get through a new song or any song we don’t know the arpeggios for. Thanks another good lesson. As you point out, I was familiar with approach notes, but had not thought how they could get me through a tune and not sound lame.

  3. MARIO June 24, 2015 at 4:53 am - Reply

    HI, MARK GREETINGS FROM MEXICO CITY,THANK YOU FOR YOUR GREAT TEACHING .IT’S BEEN A GREAT HELP FOR ME.I HAVE A QUESTION THAT I HAVE TRIED TO UNDERSTAND ,BUT I CANNOT.FOR EXAMPLE IF A MUSICIAN TELLS YOU THAT WE ARE PLAYING A SONG IN THE KEY OF C,D,E,ETC.WHAT KEYS AM I SHOULD BE PLAYING?
    THIS HAS BEEN MY MAYOR PROBLEM.PLEASE HELP ME HOW TO PLAY IN EVERY KEY THEY SAY WHEN WE ARE PLAYING ,BECAUSE I SAW MY FRIENDS AND WHEN SOMEONE ELSE SAY C,D,E, MAYOR AND MINOR THEY DON’T HAVE PROBLEMS THEY PLAY VERY WELL EVEN IF THEY HAVEN’T BEEN PLAYING TOGETHER, PLEASE, PLEASE I REALLY WANT TO LEARN THAT THANK YOU VERY MUCH BLEESINGS

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